Browse Field Crops Stories - Page 7

77 results found for Field Crops
The early summer following an El Niño winter climate pattern – like we had this past winter -- is typically warmer and drier than normal. With the warmer temperatures and drier-than-normal conditions, soil moisture will quickly decrease over the next two months. CAES News
Sizzle, sizzle!
Based on the average mean temperature, Alma, Athens, Augusta, Columbus and Savannah, as well as Tallahassee, Fla., all experienced the hottest summer on record.
Fresh brown eggs from chickens raised by a Pike County, Ga., farmer. CAES News
Finding new markets
An empty storefront on the market square in downtown Zebulon, Ga., is being eyed as the place where local agricultural crop diversity meets entrepreneurial product creativity.
Mitchell County farmer Kyle Pollock, left, and Mitchell County UGA Cooperative Extension agent Rad Yager, right, look over one of Pollock's cotton fields wiped out by the extreme drought that has covered the area for more than two months. CAES News
No rain
The cotton seedling tried. But after sending its root more than five inches deep into the parched dirt, searching for moisture, it gave up and died.
Stream flows across south Georgia, like that of the Kinchafoonee Creek in Lee County, are near record low for this time of year as drought worsens across the region. CAES News
Drought grows
Drought conditions worsened across most of Georgia during May. With well-below-normal rain and temperatures routinely in the 90s, soils continued to dry. The southern half of the state is being hit the hardest.
Keith Delaplane looks into the top of an open bee hive at the UGA apiary in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Honeybee money
Millions of bees die each year due to a phenomenon known as Colony Collapse Disorder. Scientists believe a combination of factors contribute to CCD, including pesticides, environmental and nutritional stresses and pathogens.
CAES News
Temik times out
U.S. farmers and farm experts knew they’d soon lose a popular chemical used to control major crop pests. But the end has come sooner than they expected.
GAEMN weather station on the Stripling Irrigation Park in Camilla, Ga. CAES News
Monitoring weather
The Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, operated by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is in jeopardy due to key faculty and funding losses. Georgia farmers depend on the network for weather, soil and water information that helps them make the quick decisions needed to efficiently produce their crops.
Nathan Smith is a farm economist with the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension on the UGA campus in Tifton, Ga. CAES News
Guarded optimism
Farming is a volatile business, one with enthusiastic highs matched with devastating falls.
Birds look for food on a snowy winter day. CAES News
Cold winter
Cold temperatures and heavy snow crippled north Georgia in January. Despite heavier-than-normal snowfall, precipitation amounts were below normal, increasing drought conditions across the state.