Research News

News from the Tifton Campus

Founded in 1989, the CAES Ambassador program is UGA’s oldest student ambassador group and focuses on student recruitment, student engagement and community outreach. Pictured are the 2022-23 CAES Ambassadors with Cummins, back right, and CAES Dean Nick Place, front right, in front of Conner Hall on the Athens campus. (Photo by Blane Marable) CAES News
Newest class of CAES Ambassadors hits the ground running
Founded in 1989, the CAES Ambassador program is UGA’s oldest student ambassador group and focuses on student recruitment, student engagement and community outreach. Students with a major in CAES and at least two semesters of study in the college are eligible to apply and participate in the interview process, all with the goal of being selected to wear the program’s signature red blazer.
Argentine black and white tegus, the largest of all tegus, can reach 4 feet long and weigh 10 pounds or more. CAES News
UGA-led training prepares Georgia citizens to identify and report nature’s foreign invaders
The University of Georgia’s Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health offers a unique opportunity for anyone interested in helping to preserve the state’s native ecology with its Georgia First Detectors Program. The next training for the program will be held at the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on Sept. 30.
Data science, technology and A.I. coalesce in the field of plant robotics. CAES News
RoboCrops
Say hello to Watson. A four-wheeled, phenotyping robot that operates autonomously or under human control, Watson is taking shape in Changying “Charlie” Li’s lab at the Phenomics and Plant Robotics Center (PPRC) on the University of Georgia’s Athens campus in collaboration with researchers in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. UGA Extension weed specialist Eric Prostko encourages farmers to continue to control Palmer amaranth even after their corn is harvested. CAES News
UGA Extension tests peanut herbicide for 2023 registration
Peanuts, although a major crop in Georgia, are a minor crop in the U.S., with only about 1.5 million acres planted. Due to its limited acreage, there are not many herbicides solely developed for peanuts. Emerging herbicide resistance is an increasing concern in peanut-producing states, and growers need more tools to combat pernicious weeds like Palmer amaranth.
Irrigator Pro App Credits Austn CAES News
Smart irrigation scheduling benefits producers
As climate variability increasingly affects producers across the Southeastern U.S., Wes Porter spends a lot of time thinking about water — specifically, crop irrigation — and how available tools can benefit farmers threefold.
The East Asian Joro spider, officially known as Trichonephila clavata, likely arrived in the U.S. on a shipping container around 2013. The species is native to Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and China. CAES News
Along came a spider
Joro spiders are polarizing figures. If you live in Georgia, you’ve likely seen the massive-but-harmless spiders hanging between power lines or from the eaves of your house, their golden webs glistening in the sunlight. While some find them a fascinating effect of globalization, others don’t care how they got here. They just want them gone.

In the Press

Avoid these common peanut yield-robbing mishaps and decisions
A slideshow highlighting things growers can try to avoid — or actions they can take — to get their 2020 peanut crop off to a good start.