Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Yields Down
A year after Hurricane Michael ravaged southwest Georgia, including the region’s pecan industry, farmers still are struggling as they harvest this year’s crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
Bhabesh Dutta examines an onion plant in a greenhouse. CAES News
Bhabesh Dutta examines an onion plant in a greenhouse.
Organic Onion Production
A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Organic Transition grant is funding a study of management options for center rot disease in organic onion production in Georgia and Michigan. The study is headed by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta and researchers from Michigan State University.
Pictured is a pecan affected by scab disease. CAES News
Pictured is a pecan affected by scab disease.
Pecan Scab
To protect against scab disease resistance, Georgia pecan farmers now have a new fungicide in their arsenal, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Ambrosia Beetles
Research entomologists in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are using three grants to study ambrosia beetles in an effort to prevent future attacks and preserve more fruit and nut trees.
The Southeastern Hay Contest winners were announced on Oct. 15 at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Georgia. The overall winner was Yon Family Farms from Ridge Spring, South Carolina. CAES News
The Southeastern Hay Contest winners were announced on Oct. 15 at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Georgia. The overall winner was Yon Family Farms from Ridge Spring, South Carolina.
Hay Contest
A record 380 entries were submitted in this year’s Southeastern Hay Contest (SEHC), and the grand prize was awarded to Yon Family Farms of Ridge Spring, South Carolina. The winner received $1,000 from Massey Ferguson and the choice of the use of a new Massey Ferguson DM Series disc mower or RK Series rotary rake for next year’s hay production season.
Kilowatt, the newest bulldog statue, is stationed behind the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center thanks to Georgia Power. CAES News
Kilowatt, the newest bulldog statue, is stationed behind the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center thanks to Georgia Power.
Bulldog Statues
Colorful bulldog statues have popped up all around Tifton, Georgia — from downtown to a variety of popular local businesses — to encourage support for the University of Georgia Tifton campus as part of the “Call the Dawgs to Tifton” initiative.
From right, UGA-Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West, UGA Provost S. Jack Hu and Tidewater representatives pose for a picture in front of one of the tractors donated to UGA-Tifton this fall. CAES News
From right, UGA-Tifton Assistant Dean Joe West, UGA Provost S. Jack Hu and Tidewater representatives pose for a picture in front of one of the tractors donated to UGA-Tifton this fall.
Tidewater Partnership
A partnership between Tidewater Equipment Company and the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has led to the UGA Tifton campus receiving two tractors to aid with field research this fall.
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia. CAES News
Blueberries are about to be harvested in this 2015 file photo on a UGA farm in Alapaha, Georgia.
Blueberry Disease
A plant pathologist at the University of Georgia Tifton campus is using a grant from the Georgia Farm Bureau to study a bacterial disease that is harming the state’s blueberry crops. 
This picture shows tomato spotted wilt virus damage in peanuts in 2011. CAES News
This picture shows tomato spotted wilt virus damage in peanuts in 2011.
TSWV
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait cautions Georgia peanut producers in the midst of harvesting this year’s crop that it’s never too early to look ahead to 2020, especially with regards to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV).