News Stories - Page 3

From left, UGA President Jere Morehead, University System of Georgia Chancellor Sonny Perdue, Institute for Integrative Precision Agriculture Interim Co-Director Jaime Camelio and University Professor George Vellidis attend the poster competition during the inaugural international conference. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker) CAES News
Integrative Precision Agriculture Conference
Spray drones with pinpoint accuracy, produce-picking robots, autonomous systems to monitor broiler chicken health, and artificial intelligence to predict yield before the buds have faded from the trees — these are some of the solutions integrative precision agriculture promises an industry that is embracing the power of technology to address both age-old and emerging challenges.
CAES professor Glen Rains holds the control panel to the “Little Red Rover.” The rover is a multipurpose robotic tool that can be used for planting, weed and pest management, and more. The robotic arm’s prototype camera is monitoring a small cotton plant. (Katie Walker) CAES News
4D Farm
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been awarded nearly $4 million from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop a climate-smart “4-D Farm.”
2023BrowneAwards composite image (1) CAES News
2023 Browne Awards
Four graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research. Given in honor of the former director of the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations, the award is presented to outstanding CAES master’s and doctoral students recognized for both their research and effective communication.
A technician inspects a specimen in a Center for Food Safety laboratory on the Griffin campus. (Photo by Peter Frey/UGA) CAES News
Top 5 for New Products
The University of Georgia ranks No. 2 among U.S. universities for number of commercial products to market based on its research, according to an annual survey conducted by AUTM. It is the ninth straight year UGA has ranked among the nation’s top five in this metric and seventh straight year among the top two.
UGA Extension selected Bart Davis of Davis Family Farms in Doerun, Georgia, as the 2023 Georgia Farmer of the Year. (Photo courtesy of the Georgia Peanut Commission) CAES News
Georgia Farmer of the Year
Bart Davis doesn’t seek out accolades or praise, but through an impressive dedication to his farm and the industry, honor found him at this year's Georgia Ag Forecast presentation, where he was recognized as 2023 Georgia Farmer of the Year.
While blueberries are known to be susceptible to postharvest injuries, resulting in fruit softening or splitting during harvest, handling and storage, UGA researchers are trying to figure out why some crops experience greater losses. CAES News
Blueberry Quality
A multidisciplinary team of University of Georgia agriculture experts are working to determine causes and solutions to postharvest quality problems that have hit Georgia’s blueberry growers hard in recent seasons. Funded by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Research and UGA Cooperative Extension, the project will address “major issues” with fruit quality, particularly in rabbiteye blueberries.
The 2023 Georgia Ag Forecast will be held Jan. 27 at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center and online. CAES News
2023 Ag Forecast
Registration is now open for the 2023 Georgia Ag Forecast, which will be held Jan. 27 at the University of Georgia Tifton Conference Center on the UGA Tifton campus and online. The annual seminar, offered by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and UGA Extension, shares the latest research and information from UGA faculty to help agribusinesses and producers prepare for the new year.
A peanut split in half lengthwise, exposing the pale, immature peanut inside the shell. Photo by Edwin Remsburg for UGA CAES CAES News
Peanut Protectors
On a warm morning in mid-September, tractor-drawn peanut-digging equipment burrowed beneath the peanut vines on the first of Tift County peanut farmer Greg Davis’s fields. This is the day peanut producers — and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents and UGA peanut researchers — work all season for.
University of Georgia peanut plant pathologist Bob Kemerait speaks to the crowd during the 2022 Peanut Tour. Photo courtesy of the Georgia Peanut Commission. CAES News
Peanut Cultivation
From year to year, many row crop producers rotate the crops they plant to reduce pest and disease pressure and to benefit the land, often alternating peanuts with cotton and corn. Peanuts in particular are considered an important cash crop for many farmers.