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Late summer is the right time to prepare soil for September to October plantings of cool-season crops such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, kale, Swiss chard and Brussels sprouts. CAES News
Winter Garden Prep
The end of summer into early fall tends to be the hottest time of the year in the state of Georgia. Many of us are about tired of laboring in our summer gardens, and the heat, humidity, and disease and insect pressure have certainly taken their toll on our summer crops. However, for those of us who still have the gardening itch, the last weeks of summer are the ideal time to prepare your garden for winter vegetables.
A layer of natural mulch around plants will help protect soil moisture from evaporation and provide organic material for your soils. CAES News
Water Conservation in the Landscape
You might be reaching for the watering can here in Georgia, considering recent hot and dry conditions over most of the state. And with World Environment Day coming up on June 5, home gardeners are considering what they can do to sustainably irrigate their plants and sustain soil moisture. There are actions you can take now to help conserve water in your landscape and keep your plants hydrated.
Camden County Agriculture and Natural Resources agent Jessica Warren (pictured) worked with Martin Wunderly, area water agent for UGA Extension’s Northeast District, to develop the Georgia Green Landscape Stewards curriculum. CAES News
Green Landscapes
For some residents, a pristinely manicured lawn free of weeds and undisturbed by insects is the ultimate goal. However, a new program from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension encourages creating a more natural landscape that reduces chemical use and incorporates native plants to promote biodiversity and protect the environment.
Evergreen and deciduous plants of different colors and forms can be used together to create a visually appealing landscape. CAES News
Shrub Recommendations
Do you have a small landscape, but want to add shrubs that will not overgrow the space? It is important to select plants that are suitable for the space and visually appealing.
Endless summer hydrangea CAES News
Wilted Plants
Plants with big leaves are often the first to get a little droopy in the hotter part of the day. It’s very tempting to water wilted plants at the end of the day, but late afternoon is not the best time.
Nostoc is a jelly-like substance with multiple common names like star jelly and witch’s butter. In its hydrated, gelatinous, green state, it can be a safety hazard. Slippery when wet, Nostoc dries into a black crust that can prevent stolons from rooting, or “tacking,” into the soil, delaying the growth and spread of turfgrass. CAES News
Nostoc Algae
Recent dry weather encouraged the use, and possible overuse, of irrigation systems. Followed by tropical conditions characterized by heavy rainfall and humidity, there have been reports of a jelly-like substance growing in turf.
Too much water can hurt lawns and crop production just as much as not enough water would do. CAES News
Irrigation App
University of Georgia scientists have created a new app to help Georgia vegetable growers irrigate their crops more efficiently.
Irrigation of research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. Be careful not to apply too much water as it can be just as costly as under watering. CAES News
Soil Sensors
Farmers know water is a valuable resource, and many farmers are now using soil sensors in their fields to control soil moisture content. Small-plot and home gardeners can take a cue from professional farmers by becoming more conscientious about when they apply irrigation to home landscapes and gardens throughout spring and summer, says Andre da Silva, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist.
Controlling the erosion of your soil can improve your vegetable garden and protect the soil. Soil erosion is related to multiple factors, including the type of soil and how much cover is holding the soil. CAES News
Soil Erosion
The key to successfully growing delicious vegetables is maintaining high-quality soil. We sometimes neglect to protect our soil, then rainfall comes and erosion carries our crops away. Erosion control is something that must be considered in gardens because it can protect the precious soils.