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UGA Extension's new Master Forager program is now open for registrants in the Griffin, Georgia, area. CAES News
Master Forager Program
The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s novel Master Forager program has spots available for curious Georgians interested in learning how to safely harvest and use herbs, fungi and more. The first class for the program, which begins Aug. 24, will be held at the UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia.
Basil is one of several herbs recommended for gardening this spring. It's an annual that prefers sun and moderate moisture. CAES News
Spring Herbs
Humans have used herbs since early times for medicinal purposes, for flavoring food and for fragrance. Their magical properties are entwined in the lore of many cultures and their flavor has added distinctive character to numerous regional dishes. Many modern medicines include plant parts from herbs in either a natural or synthesized state. And there is a growing field of research in pharmacognosy, as scientists look again at herbal remedies.
The UGArden’s Medicinal Herb Program markets 10 locally grown teas, including this exam season favorite. CAES News
Medicinal Herbs
In the last year, the medicinal herb program at UGArden, the University of Georgia’s student-run farm, has expanded its product line and the number of students involved has expanded rapidly.
Students peel hibiscus calyxes from the seed pods that form from the plant's showy flowers. The calyxes are used for brewing tea high in vitamin C. CAES News
Medicinal Herbs
Many gardeners keep an herb garden to stock their kitchens with parsley, thyme and cilantro. That same herb garden can turn out tasty, healthful teas.
Noelle Fuller, the UGArden Medicinal Herb Program coordinator and head herbalist, shows her interns how to propagate a horsetail plant. They cut pieces off already existing plants, and place them in water, to create new plants for their plant sale in May. CAES News
UGArden's Herb Garden
The UGArden medicinal herb garden is just a few rows of a field at the edge of the University of Georgia’s student-run farm, UGArden. But it’s become a refuge for students who want to learn about the benefits of medicinal plants and escape from stress.
Rosemary makes a terrific center or tall plant in mixed containers. The aromatic foliage does not go unnoticed. The green, fine-textured, needle-like leaves contrast with cool- or warm-season flowers like these violas. CAES News
Container herbs
Remember parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme when you design mixed containers. These four herbs will allow you to create interest through foliage, add a touch of fragrance, dazzle with color from flowers, bring in a few butterflies, freshen your breath and season like a chef.
Norman Winter, director of the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens at the Historic Bamboo Farm in Savannah, Georgia. CAES News
"Garden Guru"
Known across the South as the “Garden Guru,” Norman Winter has been writing about his passion for gardening for the past 20 years. Starting this week, his gardening columns will be distributed to media across the state by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Unlike many blueberry plants, Blue Suede holds on to its foilage throughout the year.  It is brightly colored in the fall and green in the winter. CAES News
Edible Landscaping
The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edible plants can act as substitutes for annual plants, but there are some options that can substitute for shrubs, vines and small trees.
Whether you are searching for pelleted seed, unique vegetables or hard-to-find flowers, seed catalogs are full of every kind of seed a gardener could imagine. CAES News
Garden Seed
Seed catalogs introduce gardeners to new or different plants that they may not be able to find as seedlings at local garden centers. The information in catalogs can be a bit overwhelming to novice gardeners, so it is important to know how to interpret some of the technical information and abbreviations, much like learning the language of gardeners.