Browse Lawn Maintenance Stories - Page 4

167 results found for Lawn Maintenance
Tall fescue research plots on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga. CAES News
Tall Fescue Time
To successfully establish a new tall fescue lawn or interseed an existing lawn, consider the following techniques and practices from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Yellow leaves on a tree in the fall of the year CAES News
Mower Mulching
Everyone loves to have good shade trees in their yard, but once summer is over, most people despise dealing with fallen leaves. There is an option that avoids having to rake leaves altogether: Let your mower do the work.
Beware of burrweed in your lawn. CAES News
Drought & Lawns
Last year’s prolonged drought has extended into this year. Lawns that were in poor health before the drought are having trouble greening up now. If you’re reviving a spotty lawn, perk it up with help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.  
There are two basic types of aerification, hollow and solid tine. With hollow tine a soil core is removed, while with solid tine aerification a hole is created and no core is removed. With both types, a void in the soil is created that allows air and water to more deeply penetrate the root zone. The aeration benefits are longer lasting with hollow tine (pictured) due to the removal of the core. CAES News
Room to Grow
Last year many lawns across the state didn’t receive enough rainfall for the grass to grow, photosynthesize and make carbohydrate reserves. Turfgrass that experienced this lack of rainfall will likely be slow to green up this spring. If rainfall totals return to normal this spring, lawns will recover, but they may do so at a slower rate because the production of reserves was compromised last fall. For example, a lawn that would typically be fully green and growing in mid-May might take until late May or June to green up. A two- to four-week delay in green-up of warm-season grasses may be common this spring.
CAES News
Freeze-Damaged Landscapes
Georgians have gotten through another late winter freeze. Now it’s time to figure out which plants were damaged in the home landscape.
Henbit - weed often found in turfgrass lawns CAES News
Winter Gardening
Remember, the best time to plant new trees and shrubs is in the fall or early winter. As far as pruning goes, the ideal time to prune fruit trees, landscape trees and shrubs is in late winter prior to bud break. It’s still too early to fertilize trees, shrubs and dormant lawns, like bermudagrass. Pre-emergent herbicides should be applied to lawns before annual weeds start to germinate.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Watering Rules
Fall is typically when homeowners make changes to their landscapes, like adding new plants and trees. Some 110 Georgia counties are suffering from drought conditions, but both Level 1 and 2 drought response allow for irrigation of personal food gardens at any time of day, and new and replanted plants, seeds and turfgrass can be watered for 30 days after installation.
David Jespersen is the newest member of the University of Georgia Turfgrass Team. CAES News
New Turf Researcher
New Jersey native David Jespersen was selected to fill retired UGA turfgrass physiologist Bob Carrow’s position based in part on his research on the effects of heat stress on creeping bentgrass. Jespersen is adjusting to life in the South and to working on a small extended university campus.
The horticultural crew at the University of Georgia's Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens resets a Carolina Sapphire cypress tree following a hurricane. CAES News
Storm Damage
When rebuilding your landscape after storm damage, do it in small, concentrated outdoor rooms or pockets, one area at a time. This method will help homeowners from getting overwhelmed. What took a few hours to bring down may take weeks to clean up.