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Preparing for the worst is the key to quicker disaster recovery. It's important for inland residents to plan for severe storms like Hurricane Michael, which caused extensive damage to southwest Georgia, pictured here in 2018. CAES News
Preparing for the worst is the key to quicker disaster recovery. It's important for inland residents to plan for severe storms like Hurricane Michael, which caused extensive damage to southwest Georgia, pictured here in 2018.
Hurricane Preparedness
Between dealing with the ongoing COVID-19 crisis and early indications of an especially active hurricane season, University of Georgia experts urge citizens to prepare early and remain prepared for weather-related emergencies.
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia.
Post-storm landscape care
Tornadoes and heavy winds blew across Georgia in the early morning hours on April 13, killing eight Georgians, destroying homes, and leaving landscapes littered with downed trees and limbs. Strong weather is common in Georgia this time of year, and so is cleaning up after it, said David Dickens, professor of forest productivity with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Everything on the MyPlate.gov website, Daily Food Plan, Food Tracker, Food Planner, etc., as well as all MyPyramid materials, such as the MyPyramid for Pregnancy and Breastfeeding, etc.) was developed by a team of nutritionists, dietitians, economists, and policy experts at USDA, based on expert nutrition recommendations for Americans 2 years and older from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. CAES News
Everything on the MyPlate.gov website, Daily Food Plan, Food Tracker, Food Planner, etc., as well as all MyPyramid materials, such as the MyPyramid for Pregnancy and Breastfeeding, etc.) was developed by a team of nutritionists, dietitians, economists, and policy experts at USDA, based on expert nutrition recommendations for Americans 2 years and older from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
Non-perishable Food
Making fewer trips to the grocery store during the COVID-19 emergency means that personal food supplies need to last longer. If you are at a loss for what items to stock up on, use MyPlate, www.choosemyplate.gov, as a guide to help you and add some of these non-perishable (unrefrigerated) food items to your “shelter in” diet.
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water. CAES News
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water.
Mold Removal
Following weeks of rain across many parts of the Peach State and more in the forecast, many Georgians find themselves dealing with flooded basements, backed-up septic systems, standing water, mold, mud, mud and more mud.
Decatur County farmer Bobby Barber, Jr., tells local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Nan Bostick about the day Hurricane Michael struck his farm. Bostick joined the Extension office last spring says the farmers in her county have shown her that they are resilient, positive, and are going to start over and do everything they can to be even better. "We might be bruised, but we are not broken,” she said. CAES News
Decatur County farmer Bobby Barber, Jr., tells local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Nan Bostick about the day Hurricane Michael struck his farm. Bostick joined the Extension office last spring says the farmers in her county have shown her that they are resilient, positive, and are going to start over and do everything they can to be even better. "We might be bruised, but we are not broken,” she said.
Rural Stress
Much like their counterparts across the nation, farmers in Georgia have experienced increased rates of suicide and stress over the last decade. To help curb these statistics, University of Georgia faculty are working to understand the causes of rural stress and to build systems that can help rural communities support community members in crisis.
Assistant Professor Yukiko Hashida recently joined the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. She uses her background in international law and finance to inform her research into natural resource economics. CAES News
Assistant Professor Yukiko Hashida recently joined the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. She uses her background in international law and finance to inform her research into natural resource economics.
Environmental Economics
Despite fears of rising sea levels and violent storms, many people still dream of living on the water. It’s an idyllic life — until it isn’t.
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018. CAES News
“Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions,” an interdisciplinary roundtable on the challenges facing rural America, was held in Atlanta Dec. 10-11, 2018.
Rural Stress
Farmers are extended family for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents throughout the state, and agents are uniquely positioned to raise awareness about rural stress and mental health concerns for Georgia farmers.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia.
Pecan Yields Down
A year after Hurricane Michael ravaged southwest Georgia, including the region’s pecan industry, farmers still are struggling as they harvest this year’s crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells.
My PI Georgia training in Haralson County included practicing putting fires out. CAES News
My PI Georgia training in Haralson County included practicing putting fires out.
My Preparedness Initiative
The national My Preparedness Initiative (My PI) program provides students with extensive training to be better equipped in case of emergencies. In Georgia, the My PI program was funded by 4-H and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.