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After molting into adults, periodical cicadas will move or fly to nearby vertical structures, especially shrubs and trees. The females will eventually lay their eggs on the ends of tree branches. CAES News
Tree Flagging
The emergence of Brood X exceeded expectations in north Georgia, as those of us who happen to reside in the “cicada zone” observed droves of periodical cicadas during the peak of the event. Over the past weeks, the song of the male periodical cicada has faded and fewer of these fascinating insects remain, but a sign of their passing is still evident.
Georgia First Lady and UGA graduate Marty Kemp's support for Georgia 4-H and Georgia FFA led to the establishment of a First Flock of laying hens at the Governor's Mansion in Atlanta. CAES News
First Flock
Thanks to a prize-winning chicken coop design by 4-H and FFA students from Warren County, Georgia’s newly established First Flock now has a stately home on the 18-acre grounds of Governor’s Mansion in Atlanta.
Common seasonal pests like (clockwise from top right) fire ants, houseflies, brown marmorated stink bugs and mosquitos (shown in standing water as larvae) can be controlled with simple tips from UGA Cooperative Extension. CAES News
Summer Pests
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, I see a lot of insects. People leave jars of them on my desk, send me photos or call me out to their gardens to identify them and give control recommendations.
Citizen scientists around the state can help keep track of pollinator health in Georgia by participating in the second Great Georgia Pollinator Census Aug. 21 and 22. CAES News
2021 Great Georgia Pollinator Census
Later this summer, Georgia residents will have the opportunity to help researchers find out what’s the buzz with insect pollinators in their state.
Mosquito control is a five-step process that includes education, surveillance, source reduction, larviciding and adulticiding. (Photo by David Cappaert, Bugwood.org) CAES News
Managing Mosquitoes
With summer and the first tropical storm of the season arriving simultaneously this year, we're getting warm, wet weather at a time when more folks are spending time outside. This combination is sure to signal a rise in mosquito interactions, making it a perfect time to think about mosquito control around your home and community.
When using pesticides, remember that the safe and legal use of pesticides requires that the entire label be followed exactly. Contact your local Extension agent if you're unsure about a product. CAES News
Stop, Read, Apply
As we head into summer, we start to see problems with weeds, diseases and insects in the landscape and around vegetable gardens. Some of these pest problems can be solved without the use of chemicals, but if the pest population reaches damaging levels, using pesticides may be warranted. Remember that using pesticides is safe and legal but requires reading and following label directions in their entirety.
Large patch disease, pictured here, can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible. CAES News
Large Patch
As warm-season turfgrasses continue to green up, diseases are rearing their ugly heads. The main culprit this time of year is a fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, that causes large patch disease in lawns. Large patch can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible.
Tomato lovers will attest that homegrown always tastes best, even if they don't always win beauty contests. CAES News
Summer Tomatoes
During the summer growing season, the love many have for a homegrown tomato approaches obsession. In fact, some people love tomatoes so much that they struggle to grow them — because they give their plants too much care.
A layer of natural mulch around plants will help protect soil moisture from evaporation and provide organic material for your soils. CAES News
Water Conservation in the Landscape
You might be reaching for the watering can here in Georgia, considering recent hot and dry conditions over most of the state. And with World Environment Day coming up on June 5, home gardeners are considering what they can do to sustainably irrigate their plants and sustain soil moisture. There are actions you can take now to help conserve water in your landscape and keep your plants hydrated.