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Apples grow at the Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center in Blairsville, Georgia. In Elijay, the “Apple Capital of Georgia,” orchards accumulated more than 700 chilling hours between Oct. 1 and Dec. 30, 2022. (Photo by John Amis) CAES News
Effects of Cold
With an October freeze followed by a relatively balmy December capped with several consecutive days of subfreezing temperatures, Georgia weather has experienced a few unexpected weather events from autumn into winter. Temperatures at both ends of the spectrum can affect the development of fruit crops during the dormant season, including blueberries and peaches, which are economically important crops in Georgia.
Honeybee Control and Removal certification training is underway. A class held at UGA-Griffin by Extension entomologist Dan Suiter covered state and federal laws, honeybee identification, removal techniques and more. CAES News
Honeybee Control and Removal
When a swarm of honeybees takes up residence in your house, you may not know who to call to help safely relocate the pollinators and preserve your home in the process. Thanks to a new certification program through the Georgia Department of Agriculture called Honeybee Control and Removal, it will be easier for residents to locate licensed professionals to handle the job.
UGA agricultural climatologist CAES News
Holiday Weather Conditions
The National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center announced that bitterly cold conditions during the holiday season are likely. Northern areas of the Southeast region are the most likely to experience the wintry temperatures, but even Florida may experience freezing weather.
On Aug. 23, 2019, students at Colham Ferry Elementary School participated in the state's first-ever pollinator census. On Dec. 1, the Great Georgia Pollinator Census will become the Great Southeast Pollinator Census, expanding to include both South Carolina and North Carolina in the citizen science research project. CAES News
Great Southeast Pollinator Census
Widening interest in efforts to support pollinators has led to a name change for the Great Georgia Pollinator Census, which will become the Great Southeast Pollinator Census on Dec. 1. The census began as a statewide community science initiative in Georgia in August 2019, created and coordinated by Becky Griffin, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension community and school garden coordinator.
Lewis Bartlett presents at the Young Harris Beekeeping Event last May. (Photo by Sidney Rouse) CAES News
Beekeeper Outreach
No line of research is too big or small for Lewis Bartlett — literally. From mammoth extinctions to the western honey bee (Apis mellifera), he’s published on a wide range of topics during and since university. But bees have had his attention since childhood.
Salt marshes, like this one on Jekyll Island, are vital parts of the ecosystem for oysters along the Georgia coastline. (Photo by Chris Greer) CAES News
Shell to Shore
University of Georgia alumnus Zachary Brendel gives new life to discarded things. You can see it throughout the streets of downtown Athens — from an old tire store that glows with reimagined life as Creature Comforts brewery or an audio recording school operating at full tilt within a converted shoe store. Both are revitalization projects completed by Athens-based Character Built Construction, which was co-founded by Brendel.
This female Joro is the first of the species documented in Spalding County. UGA researchers are asking citizen scientists to report Joro sightings at jorowatch.org to track the species' spread throughout Georgia. CAES News
Spider Drift
Since first making an appearance in Georgia in 2014, Joro spiders have steadily expanded their range in Georgia, and now — just in time for Halloween — the spooky-looking species has reached the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden on the UGA Griffin campus.
Buell 38999 060 web CAES News
Poplar Bioproducts
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Georgia and two partner institutions have been awarded a $15.8 million grant over five years from the U.S. Department of Energy to reengineer poplar trees to be used as a sustainable energy source. The researchers will use biotechnology approaches to breed the trees as a multipurpose crop that can be used for bioenergy, biomaterial and bioproduct alternatives to petroleum-based materials.
The Joro Watch team is pursuing a number of approaches to Joro spider research, looking into their impact on native species — like pollinators and native spiders — habitat, lifecycle and management. To help facilitate more conclusive research, UGA experts ask that the public help gather critical data by monitoring spider populations in the environment. (Photo by Carly Mirabile) CAES News
Joro Watch Initiative
They have been described as palm-sized, parachuting creatures with the potential to spread up the East Coast. Now dozens of webs are appearing in trees, on fences and in gardens around the Southeast, and social media and message boards are buzzing with Joro spider sightings. Discussions of eradication methods ranging from chemical sprays to “Joro sticks” are rampant. Joro season is here.