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Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Southern Baked Pie Company in Gainesville, accepts her University of Georgia Flavor of Georgia grand prize trophy from Gov. Nathan Deal, UGA College of Agricultural and and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue and Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black Tuesday March 15. CAES News
2016 Flavor of Georgia Winners
Amanda Wilbanks, owner of Gainseville’s Southern Baked Pie Company, baked her way to the grand prize with her caramel pecan pie in the University of Georgia’s 2016 Flavor of Georgia Contest.
UGA weed scientist Eric Prostko studies sicklepod in a greenhouse on the UGA Tifton Campus in 2015. CAES News
Sicklepod Weed
The possibility of sicklepod becoming resistant to herbicides is a potential concern for all Georgia peanut farmers, said Eric Protsko, a weed scientist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Pictured is a cotton plant impacted by thrips damage. CAES News
Thrips Management
In an effort to combat the threat of thrips infestations in cotton, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton entomologist Phillip Roberts encourages Georgia growers to be proactive with insecticide application in planting this spring. Failure to apply an insecticide treatment at planting leaves cotton plants vulnerable to increased thrips pressure, which could impact growth.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Workshop
In response to a growing number of pecan acreage across Georgia, the University of Georgia will be hosting a pecan production workshop for farmers just getting into the business. UGA Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells wants to help growers get all of the information they need at the workshop, to be held Monday, April 11.
Southern corn rust appeared at least two weeks early in 2014 (5 June) than it did in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013. Appearing earlier means that this disease will likely be more problematic than in recent years. Corn that is approaching (or has passed) the tassel growth stage is worth protecting if the yield potential is there, according to UGA Extension agent Shane Curry. CAES News
El Nino 2016
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait cautions Georgia corn farmers about the El Nino weather pattern that will likely interfere with planting this March. A delay would increase the likelihood of diseases too, so Kemerait advises growers to plant resistant varieties and be ready to apply fungicides earlier than normal.
Don Shurley, a cotton economist with the UGA Tifton Campus, talks about managing risk during a workshop on Feb. 25, 2016. CAES News
Farm Workshop
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the UGA Small Business Development Center came together on Thursday to offer a new business workshop for farmers in south Georgia. The conference provided a glimpse into the various components of a successful farming operation, including sessions on forecasting cash flow and getting your food product to the market.
Sugarcane aphids at various stages of development. CAES News
Sugarcane Aphids
Sugarcane aphids have turned their back on their namesake and become a major pest for Georgia’s grain sorghum growers. The pest began infesting fields in the state two years ago and, last year, devastated farmers who chose not to apply spray controls, said University of Georgia small grains entomologist David Buntin.
Samples of Blanc du Bois wine grapes from Trillium Vineyards. CAES News
Georgia Wine
Georgia wines may not have the same cachet as California chardonnays or French Burgundies, but they’re earning new accolades each year thanks to a community of dedicated grape growers and little help from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Members of Stanley Culpepper's team conducts a trial that is comparing methyl bromide to Paladin Pic, Trifecta, and the UGA 3-WAY. CAES News
Drift Complaints
Complaints over off-target movement of chemical applications went down 48 percent from 2014 to 2015, but Georgia farmers must better understand the factors that influence drift, according to University of Georgia weed scientist Stanley Culpepper.