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From left, CAES Congressional Agricultural Fellows Emily Smith, Brandon Poole, Guy Hancock, Jake Parker, Brock Pinson, Malik Grace and Brianna Roberts pose with a UGA flag in front of the U.S. Capitol. CAES News
2016 CAES Congressional Fellows
Seven University of Georgia students have embarked on the opportunity of a lifetime: serving as Congressional Agricultural Fellows in Washington, D.C.
Jim Robbins, University of Arkansas, will present on using unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAVs or drones, in "Drones in Production – Inventory Management and Stress Detection" at UGA Extension's Academy of Plant Production, June 12-15 in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Academy of Crop Production
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and the Georgia Green Industry Association are inviting veteran nursery and greenhouse growers to “get nerdy” with them this summer at the inaugural Academy of Crop Production, June 12-15 at Hotel Indigo in Athens, Georgia.
Georgia strawberry farmers typically spray fungicides to control Botrytis and anthracnose (shown), two fungi that cause fruit rot. University of Georgia researchers are testing a mobile app, created by University of Florida scientists, that uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for diseases. CAES News
Strawberry App
University of Georgia and University of Florida researchers are testing the Strawberry Advisory System in Georgia strawberry fields. SAS, an app created, in part, by UF plant pathologist Natalia Peres, uses temperature and leaf moisture monitors to recommend when farmers should spray for Botrytis and anthracnose, two fungi that cause fruit rot on strawberries.
Dean Pardue speaks to agriculture leaders, including Kent Fountain, at Premium Peanut in Douglas, Ga. on Wednesday, April 20, 2016. CAES News
Agriculture Tour
Weeks of visits and tours across Georgia has University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean and Director Sam Pardue excited about the college improving upon the state’s No. 1 industry — agriculture.
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Production
Undeterred by the possibility that Georgia pecans might flood the market in six or seven years, the increasing popularity of the crop has University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells encouraged about the future of the state's pecans.
Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. CAES News
Farming Economics
Low commodity prices and declining credit availability are impeding cash flow for Georgia farmers, said University of Georgia agricultural economist Brady Brewer. However, there are still options for farmers to sustain their farming operation.
UGArden manager JoHannah Biang teaches Andy Myers, Lipscomb University student of sustainability and environmental agriculture, how to drive a small tractor as part of a workshop at the 2015 Georgia Organics Conference, Feb. 20-21, in Athens. CAES News
Organic Farming Classes
University of Georgia organic agriculture experts and economists are teaming up to present the Organic Farming Workshop to provide farmers with new ways to maximize the ecology and economical sustainability of their farm.
Mark Abney, UGA Extension peanut entomologist, advocates scouting for insects in peanut fields. CAES News
Peanut Insects
University of Georgia entomologist Mark Abney is searching for ways to monitor insects responsible for destroying Georgia peanut crops. This is the first step in developing economic thresholds that will indicate to farmers when it’s time to apply controls for each pest and when it’s time to cut losses.
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.