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Seth Byrd holds a piece of rye on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Cotton Cover Crop
Georgia cotton farmers can benefit from using rye as a cover crop, according to scientists on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus. Along with providing an added defense against glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth at planting, rye significantly reduces thrips infestations and could save farmers irrigation expenses.
Tim Coolong holds a bell pepper and tomato. Both vegetables, grown on the UGA Tifton Campus, show symptoms of blossom end rot. CAES News
Blossom End Rot
Georgia’s bell pepper farmers experienced a setback in production this spring. According to University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong, some Georgia growers experienced losses of up to 25 percent due to blossom end rot — a calcium-related disorder.
Rows of cotton at a farm on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus in 2013. CAES News
Plant Growth Regulators
A University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agronomist says managing vegetative growth is key for cotton farmers. Yields and profits may be at risk without the use of plant growth regulators (PGRs).
Cotton roots infected with root-knot nematodes swell in response to the infection. These knots serve as feeding sites where nematodes (microscopic worms) grow, produce more eggs and stunt the plant's growth. CAES News
Nematode Management
In addition to low prices, controlling nematodes is top priority for Georgia cotton farmers. But with one effective control method being taken away and a new one in short supply, University of Georgia researchers and Cooperative Extension agents are working quickly to help farmers find a solution.
Pictured are dug up peanut plants on a dry land peanut field in east Tift County on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. CAES News
Peanut Scouting
Mark Abney’s message to Georgia peanut farmers is the same today as it was two years ago, when he was hired as the University of Georgia’s research and Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist: “We need to be scouting more of our peanuts.”
Pecans on the ground in an orchard on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. CAES News
Pecan Blog
A pecan blog is helping University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulture specialist Lenny Wells reach growers in Georgia and across the world.
The groundbreaking ceremony for the University of Georgia's new turfgrass research and education facilities included, left to right, UGA doctoral student Becky Grubbs; Pamela Whitten, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost; Griff Doyle, vice president for government relations; Jennifer Frum, vice president for public service and outreach; Rep. Terry England (R-Auburn); Tommy Hopkins, regent of the University System of Georgia; UGA President Jere W. Morehead; Scott Angle, dean and director of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Ken Morrow, president of Sod Atlanta Inc.; and Sen. John Wilkinson (R-Dist.50). CAES News
New Turf Facilities
More than 200 people gathered June 24 for a groundbreaking ceremony that brought new turfgrass research and education facilities on the University of Georgia’s campuses in Griffin, Tifton and Athens one step closer to completion.
Cotton is dumped into a trailer at the Gibbs Farm in Tifton on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. CAES News
Cotton Prices

Two of the world’s largest producers of cotton, China and India, play key roles in the future of cotton prices, according to University of Georgia cotton economist Don Shurley.

A pair of sunburnt watermelons sit in a field in Tift County. CAES News
Georgia Watermelons
High summer temperatures and intense sun could reduce Georgia's end-of-season watermelon production this year, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Tim Coolong. Because of the increased heat over the past week, risk of sunburn for watermelons in the field has been high. If watermelons do scald, they may not be marketable, which may reduce farmers’ normal timeframe for selling their crop.