Browse Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production Stories

556 results found for Fruit, Vegetable and Ornamental Production
Salsas are an example of an acidified food and appropriate for boiling water canning if the final pH of all components is less than 4.6. (photo by Kayla Wall) CAES News
Salsas are an example of an acidified food and appropriate for boiling water canning if the final pH of all components is less than 4.6. (photo by Kayla Wall)
Tomato Preservation
It’s the height of tomato season in Georgia and the harvest is abundant. Tomatoes can be preserved by canning, drying, freezing or pickling. They can also be used in creating fruit spreads like jams, jellies and marmalades.
"Mummy berry" disease is easily recognized when the fruit begins to ripen, as infected berries become dry, shrivel and drop prematurely. (UGA Plant Pathology/Bugwood.org) CAES News
"Mummy berry" disease is easily recognized when the fruit begins to ripen, as infected berries become dry, shrivel and drop prematurely. (UGA Plant Pathology/Bugwood.org)
Blueberry Fungus
Blueberries are one of the most popular backyard fruits for Georgia because they are relatively low maintenance compared to other fruit species. However, there is one particular disease issue known as “mummy berry” that can be problematic for blueberry growers.
UGA Associate Professor Alexa Lamm has earned the 2020 Borlaug CAST Communication Award from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology. CAES News
UGA Associate Professor Alexa Lamm has earned the 2020 Borlaug CAST Communication Award from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology.
Focusing Horticulture Research
Even if they’re born of the most exemplary research, innovative indoor plant propagation technologies aren’t beneficial if they are too costly to use.
Watermelons harvested on UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Watermelons harvested on UGA Tifton campus.
Protecting Seasonal Workers
As we approach the harvest season for watermelon, bell pepper, tomato, yellow squash, zucchini, cucumber, sweet corn and other crops, Georgia vegetable growers can move ahead and prepare seasonal workers to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 during harvest time.
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter. CAES News
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter.
Backyard Fruits Webinar
Home gardeners who want to expand their edible backyard bounty to include fruits are invited to participate in the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Backyard Fruits webinar series that runs through June 5.
UGA researchers released new red 'RubyCrisp' muscadine variety for those who want a sweet berry flavor with just a hint of muscadine. CAES News
UGA researchers released new red 'RubyCrisp' muscadine variety for those who want a sweet berry flavor with just a hint of muscadine.
Sweet, Red Muscadine
From late summer into fall, Southerners start looking for muscadines — a popular grape native to the Southeastern U.S. Selections run from the dark purple, thick-skinned traditional muscadine to a light golden green variety. Soon, growers and consumers can add a new red variety to the mix.
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas.
Preserving Citrus Productivity
With commercial citrus acreage on the rise in Georgia, producers should be aware of potential signs of citrus greening and the pests that carry the disease that has devastated the citrus industry in Florida.
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees. CAES News
Ambrosia beetle activity is identifiable by the toothpick-sized sawdust tubes they leave sticking out of holes bored in pecan trees.
Ambrosia Beetles
Georgia pecan growers should be monitoring for ambrosia beetle now, especially if they have planted new trees or their orchards include trees that are less than three years old. The tell-tale sawdust “toothpicks” sticking out of trees is a sure sign of ambrosia beetles boring into trees.
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins. CAES News
San Jose scale is a sucking insect pest which damages fruit, like this peach, and can eventually kill a tree by injecting toxins.
San Jose Scale
San Jose Scale is predicted to be particularly bad this year for peach growers, as this pest is active in temperatures over 51 degrees Fahrenheit, “so we’ve already had a lot of days for this pest population to grow,” said University of Georgia Peach Entomologist Brett Blaauw.