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When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Emergency Food
News of the coronavirus has many people feeling uneasy and helpless. Building a supply of emergency food and water is a task University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say will help Georgians prepare for any kind of emergency, be it a medical quarantine, a snowstorm or a major power outage.
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water. CAES News
Flooding, plumbing leaks and roof leaks are common causes of mold growing indoors. Mold can trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic or sensitive to molds. UGA Extension experts say that to help prevent mold from growing, water-damaged areas should be dried out within 48 hours of the event. This photo shows mold and mushrooms growing in a basement that was filled with flood water.
Mold Removal
Following weeks of rain across many parts of the Peach State and more in the forecast, many Georgians find themselves dealing with flooded basements, backed-up septic systems, standing water, mold, mud, mud and more mud.
Fifth-graders, from left, Emi Hoang, Caitlin Smith and Gia Hoang, receive kudos from Gov. Brian Kemp on their Radon Awareness Posters. Gia Hoang won first place in the UGA Cooperative Extension Radon Awareness Poster Contest. Caitlin Smith and Emi Hoang, won second and third places respectively. CAES News
Fifth-graders, from left, Emi Hoang, Caitlin Smith and Gia Hoang, receive kudos from Gov. Brian Kemp on their Radon Awareness Posters. Gia Hoang won first place in the UGA Cooperative Extension Radon Awareness Poster Contest. Caitlin Smith and Emi Hoang, won second and third places respectively.
Radon Poster Contest
Gov. Brian Kemp recognized three students from northeast Georgia for their efforts to spread the word about the dangers of radon as part of the 2020 University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Radon Education Program Poster Contest.
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon.
Radon Action Month
Radon, an odorless, colorless, tasteless, radioactive gas, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers — and your home is far from immune to it.
The path to creating less waste is a slow and steady process. CAES News
The path to creating less waste is a slow and steady process.
Green Resolutions
The new year is a great time to pick up a few habits that will help build a greener future for the planet, but new habits can be hard to maintain.
Kylie Jordan, a sixth-grader from Morrow, Georgia, won first place in Georgia's Radon Poster Contest for her poster of a sci-fi-inspired radon cloud hovering over a neighborhood. CAES News
Kylie Jordan, a sixth-grader from Morrow, Georgia, won first place in Georgia's Radon Poster Contest for her poster of a sci-fi-inspired radon cloud hovering over a neighborhood.
Radon Poster Contest
Radon, an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., but it can be detected and mitigated with the help of local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service offices across the state.  
Jermaine Durham, assistant professor of housing and community development in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, now serves as a housing and community development specialist for UGA Extension. CAES News
Jermaine Durham, assistant professor of housing and community development in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences, now serves as a housing and community development specialist for UGA Extension.
Housing Specialist
The shortage of affordable and healthy housing is nothing new for communities across the South, but new trends in infill building and gentrification have exacerbated these shortages in many cities and towns in Georgia.
Perfect composting conditions require the perfect combination of materials — not too much brown matter, not too much green matter, not too cold and not too dry. CAES News
Perfect composting conditions require the perfect combination of materials — not too much brown matter, not too much green matter, not too cold and not too dry.
Composting 101
International Compost Awareness Week is May 5 to 11 and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offices across the state are prepared to provide advice for homeowners who want to start recycling their food and landscape waste into compost to improve their soil.
A group of black flies CAES News
A group of black flies
Black Flies
One of the best things about living above the fall line in Georgia has always been the lack of gnat swarms, but that seems to have changed this spring.