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The only way to know that meat is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. Ground beef should reach at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit in the center to be safe. Color, especially that of ground beef, can be very misleading. (file photo) CAES News
The only way to know that meat is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. Ground beef should reach at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit in the center to be safe. Color, especially that of ground beef, can be very misleading. (file photo)
Summer food safety
Summer brings warm, sunny days and time outdoors, including grilling and eating outside. But just as we like the warmth and freedom of partying in the yard, so do bacteria that could make our food unsafe. They could turn a perfectly planned holiday cookout into a health concern, and even nightmare for some.
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey. CAES News
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey.
Holiday Leftovers
A focal point of holiday festivities for families every year is to gather around the dinner table and partake of delicious delicacies. But as scrumptious as those goodies are the first time, eating them again can be just as good if they are handled properly.
University of Georgia Family and Consumer Science agents remind everyone to enjoy holiday treats and yummy homemade dishes this holiday season, but don't make eating the focus of the season. CAES News
University of Georgia Family and Consumer Science agents remind everyone to enjoy holiday treats and yummy homemade dishes this holiday season, but don't make eating the focus of the season.
Comfort Foods
As we approach the holiday season, people begin to find comfort in comfort foods, rationalizing that they can work on their diet after the beginning of the new year. 
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility. CAES News
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility.
Easter Food Safety
Easter is right around the corner, and while this holiday can mean different things to different people, many celebrate it with egg dyeing, Easter egg hunts and family meals. That means food safety needs to be part of these springtime traditions too.
To save time, and stress, over the holidays, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts recommend preparing meals ahead and freezing them. Dishes, like this Southern-style dressing, can be cooked in advance and take from the freezer straight into the oven. CAES News
To save time, and stress, over the holidays, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts recommend preparing meals ahead and freezing them. Dishes, like this Southern-style dressing, can be cooked in advance and take from the freezer straight into the oven.
Frozen Holiday Treats
For those who love to prepare meals during the holidays, relieve some of the stress associated with cooking by preparing and freezing holiday treats in advance. Freezing prepared foods allows you the satisfaction of homemade meals with the convenience of store-bought ones.
Raw turkey ready to be cooked. CAES News
Raw turkey ready to be cooked.
Frying Turkeys
Fried turkeys continue to be a popular holiday option in the South, but if they’re cooked wrong, they can result in a burnt bird or an unexpected trip to the emergency room.
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey. CAES News
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey.
Cooking A Turkey
Whole roasted turkey is the centerpiece for many holiday meals and gatherings. There are a variety of ways to prepare and present it. Just as important as flavors and textures, however, is food safety when preparing and cooking a turkey.
Steaks on the grill. CAES News
Steaks on the grill.
Grill Safety
Bacteria love warm environments as much as you enjoy the warm outdoors, and they can turn your perfect holiday weekend cookout into a health nightmare. Food safety is as important when grilling and serving food outdoors as it is in the kitchen because improperly handled food can make you sick.
Propane-fired turkey fryers on display in a sporting goods store in Macon, Georgia. CAES News
Propane-fired turkey fryers on display in a sporting goods store in Macon, Georgia.
Fried Turkeys
Frying a holiday turkey may sound like fun, but it can be tricky. Here are a few tips from University of Georgia experts to help make sure your bird is thoroughly cooked and your holiday doesn't include a trip to the emergency room or a call to the fire department.